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< 109b. Spider's Shadow
111. The Doomwood Curse >

110. The Boy that Time Forgot

Rating Votes
10
6%
6
9
3%
3
8
14%
14
7
22%
22
6
24%
24
5
11%
11
4
13%
13
3
1%
1
2
1%
1
1
3%
3
Average Rating
6.3
Votes
100
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
8
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Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 12/12/16 8:04 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

‘The Boy That Time Forgot’, by Paul Magrs, is a story that inserts itself into the continuity of the programme’s history and leaves me feeling divided. On the one hand, the idea behind the story is quite inventive. On the other hand, it undermines the poignancy of Adric’s death in ‘Earthshock’, the dialogue is often just plain wrong and the two Victorian characters are flat caricatures. Block computation also makes a return.

The premise being that Adric managed to escape his death in ‘Earthshock’ by using Block Transfer Computation; consequently, creating a world where he lives and is served by his scorpion subjects. After many years, Adric decides to use Block Transfer Computation to summon the Doctor and Nyssa with two Victorian spectators who don’t appreciate the detour in their daily routine. Andrew Sachs’ raving interpretation of a long isolated Adric is sublime. Magrs script paints the character as resentful and slightly reminiscent of Omega. Peter and Sarah are spot-on with their performances and the soundscape is rich and vivid as always.

The story has a strong fantasy element with people moving through time by chanting numbers and Adric trapped in his own pocket universe achieving certain feats by sheer will power, (c.f. Omega). Adric veers between sinister and silly at times and while some may criticise this as inconsistent characterisation, I enjoyed the unpredictability. Paul Magr’s script sets a good pace with lots of action but can be heavy with technobabble and exposition. (Is it still technobabble if it’s fantasy? ) The absence of the Tardis creates some genuine suspense but the resolution frees this story of any consequences and makes the whole adventure rather moot.

Ultimately, I think this was a good story that feels like a first draft, I found this too inconsistent and too fantasy based with bad dialogue and flat, pointless supporting characters. This is counterbalanced with good production values and interesting ideas. Entertaining but uneven.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 6/23/15 9:12 am
2 out of 3 found this review helpful.

This is a story that probably shouldn't have been done. The death of Adric in Earthshock was one of the most memorable moments in Doctor Who history. While recent productions like the Widow's Assassin have shown that a great story can be produced from filling in an ambiguity in continuity. However, what happened in Earthsock is clear and saying, "Wait, Adric didn't really die," and recasting the rolle in an audiodrama twenty-five years after the fact is a bad idea.

Still, "The Boy that Time Forgot" is a rarity-a bad idea done well. Without the TARDIS around, it was nice to see both the Doctor and his companions as well as the Insect inhabitants of Adric's city. There are some good character moments for the Doctor and a few nice moments that remind me of how good he and Nyssa are together. The characters of Rupert and Mrs. Mapp grow from Victorian stereotypes into actually interesting characters by the end of the story.

Andrew Sachs is superb as Adric, really capturing the essence of the character: his ego, his whiny self-pity, his sense of self-importance, his fixation on Nyssa, as well as the nobler aspects of the character that were lesser seen. Sachs really elevates the story particularly in the final scenes.

In addition to the conceptual problem, block transfer computation is such a vital part of this story and it does feel like Magrs is a tad out of his depth in writing about it as it's never seemed more like magic using binary numbers.

Still, I found this entertaining despite its flaws thanks to strong acting and a few memorable twists along the way.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
2
Effects Rating:
5
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: Grumpy Old ManReview Date: 4/27/15 8:40 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

I started this story with low expectations but had started on the Thomas Brewster arc so decided to give it a shot. Turned out to be a lot better than I had expected from the ratings to date. I generally associate Paul Magrs with "off the wall" and the central idea was certainly in keeping with this (though not as much as some of his stories, remembering that this is the guy who created Iris Wildthyme). The plot device to enable time travel at the start wasn't the most nonsensical idea I've ever heard and worked reasonably well in the context of the story. The performances were good, though I found the incidental sound to be fairly minimal (Big Finish usually go to town on the jungle soundscapes). Overall not a chore to listen to but with limited replay value.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 1/17/15 9:20 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

This is one of those Big Finish releases that I cannot quite put my finger on whether it is brilliant or mediocre (Big Finish never make bad drama, but they can sometimes hit indifference very easily). This picks up from the Haunting of Thomas Brewster and although there is no need to have listened to the previous adventure really required, it, does in truth add some sort of reference to the end of the story. Peter and Sarah are as ever without issue, the material is excellent, with the idea of the Doctor using higher mathematics and good dose of metaphysics to perform a time travel into space, as, per the previous episode Thomas Brewster as stolen it. We soon find that our Doctor is using the premises of a seance to conjure the ability to time travel, he and the amassed seance attendee's soon find themselves however transported to a planet, which, is the inhabited by insects of the scorpion variety, of which seem to be beholden to a ruler in the shape of Adric! He is not dead, but as turned up as some sort of Insect Emperor who has come to control and rule of a planet full of these carnivorous creatures whom seem to want to consume the Doctor and his colleagues.

It soon becomes apparent that the Doctor not only as to challenge the megalomaniac Adric from continuing his foley, but also get back to Victorian England to return to safety. Along the way we discover the reason how Adric as become who he has and why he has dedicated his existence to the creation of essentially his own planet. We also come to understand that Adric was not the sole reason for his existence, he had help.

The acting in this is above average, the story, I think gets itself lost within in it's own story arc, therefore, with more careful re-write an perhaps a different production this could have been as good as 5th Doctor adventure's can be......
As it stands it is a fine example of Big Finish release, just expected more than I got from this.