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< Time-Flight
Snakedance >

Arc of Infinity

Rating Votes
10
2%
2
9
2%
2
8
11%
9
7
40%
32
6
22%
18
5
12%
10
4
10%
8
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
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Average Rating
6.5
Votes
81
Director:
Writer:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
5
Replay Rating:
4
Effects Rating:
5
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: TCar96Review Date: 10/23/16 2:29 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Well, it's not timeflight...

There's a bittersweet feel to timeflight. On paper it's a corker - Omega, back through the machinations of a duplicitous timelord. The Doctor, brought back to Gallifrey subject to political intrigue. High canon, as timelord history drives the serial. To top off? Film work in Amsterdam!

In execution however Arc of Infinity really bodges up. Unlike the Deadly Assassin, set work on Gallifrey and sparking dialogue between timelords is gone. Bland direction with hollow characters in a cheap set. Furthermore, unlike the Deadly Assassin, which did a stellar job of visualising high concepts like the matrix, Arc of Infinity muddles along.

From documentary comments by Eric Saward, I think this probably originates from JNT's decision to go to Amsterdam. The two elements never quite mesh leading to a muddled space opera in Gallifrey and some directionless wandering about Amersterdam - unlike the Mona Lisa in City of Death there's little plot relevance, and secondly there's nothing explicitly gimmick-worthy (like, say the Eiffel Tower).

A great synopsis ends up with our cast (one of which, Tegan, entirely unwelcome) running about past some graffiti and non-descript buildings. Not so City of Death...
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: X-altReview Date: 2/5/16 7:36 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Here is a severly underrated story which begins as the story of young adults sleeping in a "spooky" crypt, a "pump house": "Well I'm not too keen on the neighbors" is probably the funniest quote in the four-episode story given that comedy is utterly absent from it. In parallel, there's the Gallifrey plot (and the noted presence of Colin Baker). An air of mystery lingers throughout the story and it took me a couple of episodes before I was able to join the two given that a great majority of the plot centers on the Doctor himself, as he reveals himself the only medium for one of his most underrated archenemy to reappear.

Highlights were the return of Time Lords as early as episode 1, and especially Omega -- came as no surprise for me, as evidenced by the costume, the fact that he comes from another "dimension", as well as the overall matter/antimatter intrigue laid out as early as episode 1 (the Doctor, however, is very long to react and identify the creature "bonded" with him) -- and the (short) absence of Tegan, giving Nyssa more screen time (I think she was left in the background in season 19 due to the presence of two other companions with an history -- something quite new for a companion at the time!) as she's the only one to attend to the Doctor when he's in trouble, both in the TARDIS (episode 1, when the "bonding" began) and on Gallifrey, where she pleads for the Doctor's innocence (episode 2) or after his mind was transferred into the Matrix, leaving him helpless and incapacitated (episode 3). Plus, we're not even sure, at least in episode 1, that Tegan will definitely come back given that, during season 19, one of her principal concerns had clearly been to go back home and be sure not to miss her professional interview at the airport she was driving to when she met the Doctor. This has changed in season 20 and she appears eager for adventure (in episode 4 she is even happy to have "got the sack") and plays the role of the leader in the Earthbound plot, especially in episode 2 (she is captured by Omega in episode 3 only to be used in order to "persuade" -- blackmail -- the Doctor).

I must say I found it an excellent episode to begin season 20, and a good episode overall, probably one of Fifth's best in terms of convincing acting and intrigue. An interesting addition to the Whoniverse was probably the introduction of the "Matrix", introduced in episode 1 and recurring throughout the story. We also learn of Leela's marriage to a Gallifreyan. What I liked about this episode is also the characterization of Nyssa, who I thought had been a bit redundant in the previous season, who is seen kicking asses in the two middle episodes... at last! More generally, episodes dealing with the relationship between the Doctor and his people are rare, and often misunderstood (as in New Who's The End of Time). When Zorac declared in episode 2 that "each and every time the Doctor returns to Gallifrey there's violence", an older Time Lord, Councillor Hedin, answers: "Perhaps it is we who should modify our approach".

It is true that the Time Lords had so far left Doctor with almost no initiative ("The War Games", "The Three Doctors" etc.): though deemed not to have been "cooperative" by Castellan in episode 2, using Romana as example, any hooked audience would remember that the first time they heard about the Time Lords was this story in which the Second Doctor is forced to regenerate and sent to Earth, or that the Third Doctor had to bargain with them after the 10th anniversary story to regain the right to travel in time and space, or that they forced him to travel to Skaro in order to destroy the Dalek in season 12 etc. This episode conveys new outlooks for the Time Lords, showing them clearly as dependent on the Doctor -- as they already were in Omega's first episode. A shame that the character of Omega is not properly explored and that he remains a 'baddy', because the existence of a Time Lord castaway in a world of anti-matter is a very interesting theme, though it was far less exploited than in "The Three Doctors".

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 3/8/15 4:26 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This story sees the Doctor returning to Galifrey and facing annihilation at the hands of the Higaaouncil of Time Lords after a mysterious interdimentional entity bonds with him and is prepared to transfer over to our reality from an anti-matter universe.

The first three episodes on Gallifrey are entertaining and quite fun as this was the show's first time being on Gallifey since Season 15. The supporting cast was enjoyable, most notably future Doctor Colin Baker. Sarah Sutton gets to step up as Nyssa and enjoy a prominence she never quite had during Season 19 with its crowded TARDIS while a lot of mystery surround Tegan's sub-plot in Amsterdam. The Doctor was a tad passive in the early going.

Things do get a bit dodgier in Part Four with some silly plot turns (using a phone book to find a youth hostel and then not having change and the ending plot twist for the TARDIS future kind of left me a bit cold and felt a tad cheesy. Still, this story pushed the fifth Doctor quite out of his comfort zone at the end, and also had some great exterior shots in Amsterdam which were pretty impressive though not quite as good as the shots of Paris in City of Death. Overall, a solid beginning to Doctor Who's 20th Season.