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< 83. Something Inside
85. Red >

84. The Nowhere Place

Rating Votes
10
9%
10
9
16%
18
8
31%
35
7
23%
26
6
15%
17
5
1%
1
4
5%
6
3
0%
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2
0%
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1
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Average Rating
7.6
Votes
113
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User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
4
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Silence Will FallReview Date: 10/28/18 9:55 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Nowhere Place was one of those stories that immediately jumped out to me when I was browsing the Big Finish catalogue. It seemed to do that thing that Doctor Who does best- putting something mysterious, creepy and unexplained into a more technological, scientific and realistic environment. That contrast often works brilliantly. Here, it sadly didn't. Initially, I loved this creepy and atmospheric mystery that the story set up. A strange bell, only heard by a select few of the ship's crew. An impossibly old door that is just sitting on the wall of a storage bay. And the sounds of a 20th century steam engine coming from behind it. And that's even before the killing starts. People being lured to the door by... something, and going through into 'Nowhere', I immediately assumed that this was going to be a creepy-as-hell and quite exciting story.

Sadly, this was not the cause. At the end of the second episode, the story temporarily ditched it's space-age environment for the aforementioned 20th century steam engine, the 'Ivy Lee'. So there I was, expecting to see the mystery slowly revealed in episode 3, and as there were only 2 other characters (alongside the Doctor and Evelyn of course), I assumed that the mystery must revolve around one of them. By the end of episode 3, my head was in my hands because I now realised that the entire episode was a detour from the main story in order to fill an episode. Even though I could have happily listened to another episode in the future, WHERE THE ACTUAL STORY WAS TAKING PLACE!

Of course I then made the mistake of thinking it couldn't get any worse. The Nowhere Place's actual explanation was instead incredibly long-winded and boring, filling my mind with pointless drivel about... something... I guess. It was far too over-complicated and unlike a lot of Doctor Who stories similar to this, the creepiness was completely ruined by the fact that the resolution felt so detached and improperly explained.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: BrainofMorbius23Review Date: 7/24/18 10:19 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Ominous and spooky I like it when an entry takes me by surprise. It’s a good outing with a mysterious door for 6 and Evelyn.
Cast are good and I dunno I just enjoy stories like this !
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 9/27/17 1:32 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This is a story that starts off strong, dips a bit in Part Three, before falling apart completely in the last episode.

The story starts as an extremely effect mystery. The nature of the threat is completely unknown, and the events that are taking place are totally bizarre. But it works! The setting is a sort of aircraft carrier in space (like Battlestar Galactica) in the late 22nd century, where fighter pilots are defending Earth's solar system from alien raiders. While that could easily be the jumping off point for its own story, here it's just the setting. It's just a location and a set of characters where and to whom inexplicable things are happening.

Stories that are hard to follow can be very off-putting, but this story is reassuring in that the Doctor doesn't understand what's going on any more than the rest of us. The idea of a thoroughly inexplicable mystery is very compelling, and that's largely what fuels the first two episodes. Some people start hearing a mysterious bell that other people can't here, and then they're drawn to this mysterious door that has appeared on the ship leading to nowhere.

The story starts to lose focus when the Doctor tracks the sound of the bell to a railway station in England, 1952. There, the Doctor finds Trevor Ridgely, an engineer involved in top secret military research. This seems like a promising development, but the story has as little to do with Ridgely's top secret research as it has with the alien raiders menacing Earth's solar system. The real story, unfortunately, is far less interesting.

And that's where the whole thing falls apart. It turns out that Trevor Ridgely idly doodled some sketches which would one day be noticed by someone else, and would set human technology on the path toward faster-than-light travel. This is where the story started to lose me. The story expects us to believe that if Trevor Ridgely's doodles are lost, humanity will never be able to leave its solar system. That is simply ludicrous. That's like saying that you went back in time and killed Isaac Newton as a child, humans would never have discovered Newton's Laws, but of course we would have. Someone other than Newton would have discovered them (so they wouldn't have been called Newton's Laws) eventually. If an English engineer from the 1950s can idly doodle something resembling a workable starship design, someone else would have figured it out eventually,

The story also involves intelligent beings who supposedly lived on Earth fifty billion years ago, never mind that the planet is less than fifteen billion years old. [Oops. Did I say "the planet is less than fifteen billion years old"? I meant "the planet is less than five billion years old". The *universe* is less than fifteen billion years old.] The motivation of these creatures is, if anything, even harder to swallow. They were destroyed when they tried to leave the solar system, and despite having been destroyed, they have the power to similarly destroy all every intelligent species which has come along after them and tried to leave the solar system, simply out of spite. Not only is this a terribly petty motivation, but this story is suggesting is that many, many intelligent civilizations developed on Earth before humanity (and before the Silurians, presumably), but they were all destroyed when they tried to leave the solar system, leaving no trace. This is simply ridiculous, even by "Doctor Who" standards.

This isn't a bad story, but it's terribly disappointing in that it starts so well and falls apart into utter drivel.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 8/24/17 5:11 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Doctor and Evelyn arrive on a spaceship where the crew are being led by something into a door...a door that leads to nowhere.

Overall, the concept and set up really does a superb job of creating a sense of menace and mystery for the Doctor to solve. Captain Oswin makes a good foil for the Doctor, and mostly stays out of the realm of caricature. I also thought the story did well to give the listeners a bit of comic relief in the third episode before getting truly scary at the end of that episode. The solution is complicated, but it does make sense of all that had been happening.

Overall, this is another fine outing for the Sixth Doctor and Evelyn.