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Reviews By thisoldcan
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Avg Rating:
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 5/1/18 5:11 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

In Rise of the New Humans, after a man who jumped off a building started to grow wings, the Doctor (Tim Treloar) and Jo Grant (Katy Manning) find themselves investigating the Allingham Institute, a remote hospital that promises miracle cures for the most debilitating injuries. But the Institute is being run by an old acquaintance of the Doctor’s, one who may just have gone too far with his meddling finally. Rise of the New Humans is a strong tale to open the fourth Third Doctor Adventures set. Tim Treloar and Katy Manning get the opportunity to show off their excellent chemistry with one another, recalling the chemistry between Jon Pertwee and Manning often, as the two come into conflict with the Meddling Monk. Rufus Hound’s performance is the highlight of the story; Hound is always good for a strong guest spot as the Meddling Monk, but Hound delivers an exceptional performance that highlights the highs and lows of the character; the smarmy, weasley characteristics and the cowardly, disloyalty of the character when placed under pressure. Guy Adams is tasked with writing the first full-cast encounter between the Third Doctor and the Monk, and comes up with a strong narrative for it. I particularly liked the characterizations of all the characters, but especially of Jo, the Doctor, and the Monk. They felt very true to the original characters, but also different enough in their interactions with the new version of the Monk to feel novel. The plot was an enjoyable story, styled after the base-under-siege stories of the Second Doctor’s era, in a way. I particularly enjoyed the plot of the New Humans virus, and the resolution of the story, as it brought a surprisingly affecting aspect to the story. Overall, Rise of the New Humans is a strong story, carried by a fantastic guest spot by Rufus Hound and two strong leading performances by Tim Treloar and Katy Manning. Writer Guy Adams crafts a story that’s at times tense and exciting, with some strong cliffhangers, and strong characterization, that acts as one of the highlights of the Third Doctor Adventures sets.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 4/28/18 2:54 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

In The Last Beacon, Owen Harper (Burn Gorman) and Ianto Jones (Gareth David-Lloyd) are sent to the Welsh countryside to investigate a mysterious, alien signal. But Owen doesn’t understand the charm of the countryside or why Ianto is so insistent on finishing the mission on his own, and the results could spell disaster for the two. The Last Beacon is a strangely light Torchwood tale, but one that works out extremely well. Burn Gorman and Gareth David-Lloyd both deliver strong performances in their own ways; Gorman for his comedic one, and Gareth David-Lloyd for his at times earnest, comedic one and at other times for his quieter, more poignant performance. Guest star Ellie Darvill gives a strong performance as the central “villain” of the story, and surprises with a poignant performance. Gareth David-Lloyd handles double duty this story, as star and writer. He crafts one of the lightest Torchwood stories in recent memory; apart from a few, “fucks” and “bullocks”, and a scene featuring two kids jerking each other off, the story doesn’t really use it’s “contains adult material” warning, opting instead for an at times funny story, and at other times, a quieter, poignant one. David-Lloyd’s strength lies mainly in his hilarious script, as he crafts an excellent script not only for his own character, but for Burn Gorman’s as well. The plot is strong as well; it’s an interesting mystery that drives the plot, of a mysterious beacon, and the payoff in the end is a surprisingly poignant one. Overall, The Last Beacon is one of the lightest Torchwood stories in recent memory, but Gareth David-Lloyd proves with his script that you don’t need gratuitous murder or swearing or sex scenes to tell a strong Torchwood story. Instead, he crafts a light-hearted, slightly rompy adventure, with lots of great dialogue that, when brought to life by himself, Burn Gorman, and the rest of the guest cast, makes for a thoroughly enjoyable, rompy adventure.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 4/28/18 2:30 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

In Believe, the latest offering from Big Finish’s Torchwood Special Releases range, the classic Torchwood team are back together, investigating a mysterious Church with a personal connection to Torchwood. As the group investigates, they find themselves confronted by agents of the Church on all sides, and struggling to trust their friends and allies. Believe is a good tale, and a story that fits in extremely well with the era of Torchwood it’s set in, Series 2. This story features the original cast of John Barrowman, Gareth David-Lloyd, Burn Gorman, Naoko Mori, and Eve Myles united together once again, alongside a solid guest cast. Burn Gorman and Naoko Mori were my favorites of the main cast, as the two had an excellent arc, and showed off their brilliant antagonistic but sexually charged chemistry in this story well. Gorman was a revelation throughout, with a strong character arc, and a strong depth to his performance, while Mori gave a fantastic, out-of-the-box performance, especially with regards to her character’s relationship with Owen. The guest cast was generally solid; the highlights for me were Lois Meleri Jones and Rhian Blundell, as Andromeda and Erin. Meleri Jones was solid in her paranoia, and surprisingly good in her character’s pivot to villainy in the latter half of the story, while Blundell had an interesting chemistry with Gareth David-Lloyd throughout that played out well. Frequent Big Finish writer Guy Adams was tapped to create this story, and the results are enjoyable, if a bit off-putting at times. The story is a rather thinly-veiled reference to Scientology, and Adams lays it on a bit thick at times; it lacks subtlety and it really ground my gears the way that it was presented. But the story is an enjoyable, rompy adventure, split up into about five different threads. I personally thought that the Owen and Tosh bit of the story was the highlight, as the story did a really great job focusing on their relationship and what they mean to one another. I was slightly disappointed by the lack of Jack in the story, but I’ll chalk that up to Barrowman’s availability. Adams did a really great job giving a lot of backstory to the Church of the Outsiders throughout the story; I especially liked the looks at the hierarchy and “The Greys”, which were a fantastic, creepy creation. The highlight of Adams’ script though is in the ending, as he comes up with a strong ending that doesn’t feel like an ass-pull. Overall, Believe is certainly a flawed story at times, especially in its overall message and lack of deep performances, apart from the fantastic Burn Gorman and Naoko Mori. But the story is an enjoyable return for the classic Torchwood cast, and a strong trip back in time to Series 2 of Torchwood.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 4/22/18 2:12 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Last Chance, the final story of the Tenth Doctor Chronicles is a strong, emotional adventure for the Jacob Dudman-helmed stories. Dudman is a strong presence throughout the story; he refuses to settle for simply giving a strong impression, and showcases a surprisingly broad range in his acting, showcasing the Tenth Doctor’s more crazy, wild moments and the quieter, more somber moments that make the character so strong. Michelle Ryan is similarly strong as Lady Christina, giving an emotionally broad performance as well, though she is a delight in nearly every scene she’s part of, regardless of what emotions she’s conveying. Guy Adams crafts a story with a message that he’s clearly passionate about, and manages to create a story rife with strong symbolism and great emotional connections, while still managing to tell an enjoyable, rompy adventure. The larger-than-life villain, at times, risks devolving firmly into the over-the-top, camp category, but Adams is able to successfully reign it in by the end. He’s able to deliver a strong tale for any Doctor’s era and, with the help of the cast, makes a really great story for the Tenth Doctor and Lady Christina.

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