Stories:
2849
Members:
726
Submitted Reviews:
7923
Reviewers:
338
Reviews By thisoldcan
# Reviews:
144
# Ratings:
1555
Avg Rating:
8

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
5
Plot Rating:
4
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
1
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 2/11/19 2:28 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

In The Scapegoat, the finale to Crossfire, Part 2, the Liberator Crew arrives on the planet of Astra Valadina for a seemingly routine arms deal. But the former President (Hugh Fraser) is seeking to wipe out support for Servalan, and is using the Liberator crew as his pawns, in an effort to kill two birds with one stone. His plan will lead to the crew coming to confront their own legacy in more ways than one. The Scapegoat is a strong story for the character of Vila, while giving a rather boring supporting adventure for the rest of the crew. Michael Keating is an absolute triumph in The Scapegoat, playing up Vila as he normally does, but also bringing out a shocking amount of depth in the character, facilitated by the writing of his character and the guest performance of Toby Longworth’s Lockwood. It’s a story that has an element of confronting possible lives, as Vila realizes that if he’d declined to join the Liberator, he would’ve ended up as Lockwood does at the end of the story, and that view gives his character a sort of quiet power in the story. Unfortunately, as good as the story surrounding Vila and Lockwood is, Steve Lyons struggled to make an engaging, or really sensible plot out of the rest of the story. Lyons tries his best, but the former President’s plan just can’t make sense, while B-plot upon C-plot peter out into nothing. The crew tries their best to make something interesting out of trying to salvage the arms deal and escape Astra Valadina, but Lyons just can’t make it engaging, in the end. The story’s focus on the character of Vila and his reflection on his role on the Liberator and what could have been are the highlights of The Scapegoat, and should’ve been the main focus of things. Instead, Lyons tries his best to give everyone a fair story, and the end result is a generally average affair, with a couple of bright spots. Despite some brilliant acting from Michael Keating and Toby Longworth, the story ends Crossfire, Part 2 with less of a bang, and more of a small pop.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 2/11/19 2:27 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

In Cavan Scott’s Shock Troops, the second story of the second Crossfire set, Trooper 229R, colloquially known as ‘Niner’ (Imogen Church) is working for the Federation, going on mission after mission. But the arrival of a new trooper, Trooper 817A (Yasmin Bannerman) raises Niner’s concerns, as she believes the group now has a traitor in their midst. Shock Troops is a strong story, that gives the narrative over to the “other side” of Blake’s 7, the Federation, giving the listener a taste of what’s on the other side. The cast of this story is simply superb. Leading the cast is Imogen Church as Niner, alongside Yasmin Bannerman as “Trooper 817A”, better known as Dayna. Church shows off a strong range throughout the story, showcasing the wide range of emotions soldiers go through, as well as the disturbing servile nature of a brainwashed Federation trooper. Matching her is the excellent Bannerman, who has quickly become one of the highlights of these sets, as the recast Dayna. This story works as an excellent showcase for Bannerman, as she’s not truly portraying Dayna, but a slightly brainwashed version of the character. She too shows off an impressive range, from her gleeful joy over the deaths of rebels, to the extraordinarily dark argument she has with Rodrigues’ character over what to do with Avon. Cavan Scott’s script is another highlight, as he is able to bring a bit of humanity to the Federation, namely in the form of Niner, while also showing off the more disturbing elements of the Federation in the story, namely coming from Tania Rodrigues’ ‘Captain’. Perhaps my favorite part of the story is the arc for Dayna, as she’s captured by the Federation and forced to become an agent against the Liberator crew. It’s an interesting idea, and one that I’m happy they decided to explore. Overall, Shock Troops is probably the best story yet to come out of Crossfire; it’s got a great story from Cavan Scott and a fantastic cast, led by an excellent Imogen Church and a fantastic Yasmin Bannerman. It’s a great correction for the set, and a strong indicator of what these sets can do right.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
5
Plot Rating:
3
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
1
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 2/11/19 2:26 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

In Funeral on Kalion, the opening story of the second Crossfire set, Thern Sorron, the ruler of Kalion, supplier of ships to the Federation, is dead. His death leaves a power vacuum that several parties are seeking to fill, for whoever controls Kalion controls it’s powerful shipyards. Kerr Avon (Paul Darrow) leads a daring heist to steal the Seal of Kalion, while Servalan (Jacqueline Pearce) and the former President (Hugh Fraser) tangle with one another and Maldor (Trevor Littledale), seeking to control the Kalion shipyards. Funeral on Kalion is a decidedly average story from frequent Blake’s 7 writer, Trevor Baxendale. The story is marked by its strong cast, most notably Paul Darrow, Michael Keating, and Trevor Littledale. Darrow and Keating are both strong, and share a surprising chemistry throughout the story; I found myself most enamored with Keating’s Vila throughout the story, as he injected a bit more energy than usual into his performance. Trevor Littledale has a wonderful guest spot as Maldor, the man tasked with presiding over Thern Sorron’s funeral and the choice of his successor. Littledale has a great monologue early in the story where he gets to show off his fantastic acting chops, and he shares a strong, slightly comedic chemistry with Jacqueline Pearce and Hugh Fraser throughout the story. Trevor Baxendale is given the task of writing the opening story of the second set, and comes up with an interesting heist-style story that can’t quite stick the landing. I quite liked the constant struggle for power and the way that Baxendale pulled the rug out from underneath Servalan, the former President, and Avon, but the story was painfully predictable, and it suffered due to its lack of meaningful interactions between the two main groups. Overall, Funeral on Kalion starts off Crossfire, Part 2, not with a bang, but with a shrug. The acting is strong throughout, especially Michael Keating and Trevor Littledale, but the writing, while promising and enjoyable in its rompiness, fails to do something unexpected, and suffers by not having the main characters interact with one another. A heist-style story should’ve been a winning story for Blake’s 7, despite the fact that there was only one possible outcome of it; but instead, the story is a bit of a boring, predictable affair, with strong acting, but little else to support it.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 2/11/19 2:24 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The Way Ahead is a reliable, strong celebration of forty years of Blake’s 7, and a strong, loosely linked, two-part story. Mark Wright is given the task of writing the 40th anniversary celebration, and largely delivers with a lore-heavy love letter to the series. His two-part adventure sees the return of Avalon, a character originally played by Julia Vidler, and now played by Olivia Poulet, across two periods of her life, and the expansion on Aquitar, a substance that both Blake and Avon had worked with, and something that was expanded upon in fanfiction in the 90’s. The main story of The Way Ahead is a look at the legacy of Roj Blake, told through three eras. It’s a resoundingly powerful tale, as Wright really gets into what Blake’s legacy is and, most importantly, it’s most enduring character’s place within the story of Blake, Avon. Wright wisely shows three different perspectives throughout the story; the actions that inspire others to join Blake’s cause (Project Aquitar), the consequences when they go to far (Dissent), and the struggles of a man wondering if he did the right thing (the framing device with Avon). It’s a powerful overarching narrative, and one that serves as a fitting celebration of forty years of Blake’s 7. Individually, the stories have their ups and downs; Dissent is the better of the two stories, a powerful tale that gives a lot of insight into the Liberator’s crew members and their morals. Project Aquitar is a promising story, but Wright’s hand-waving to distract from Gareth Thomas’ death instead draws attention to these awkward methods. Throughout the story, Paul Darrow is a shining star; his performance in the second story especially is perhaps one of his finest performances in the role. Both stories are supported by a variety of strong performances; Sally Knyvette and Stephen Greif in the first story, and Olivia Poulet and Jacqueline Pearce help to make the second story all the better. Overall, The Way Ahead is certainly not without faults, but the celebration of forty years of Blake’s 7 is a strong, enjoyable tale anyway. It’s well-acted and has a powerful overarching arc that serves as a fitting celebration of the forty year history of the show.

Project Aquitar (6/10)
Dissent (9/10)

Community

?>