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Reviews By thisoldcan
# Reviews:
184
# Ratings:
1595
Avg Rating:
8

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 3/20/19 4:12 pm
3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

The Star Beast is a strong story, delivering a very faithful adaptation of the original comic, and presenting a solid story, with a good plot, great writing, and strong performances. Tom Baker stars the Fourth Doctor, alongside Rhianne Starbuck as Sharon, and guest stars Ben Hunter as Fudge and David Dixon Bate as Beep the Meep. Baker delivers a solid performance here; the addition of a more stable companion brings out the best of his performance, with all the charm and gravitas intact. Starbuck gives a promising performance as Sharon, ably handling the role while infusing the character with a lot of depth that’s otherwise absent from the character. Hunter and Bate are both excellent in their respective roles; I thought that Hunter made Fudge a very sympathetic, engaging character through his performance, while Bate was delightful as the delightfully bonkers Beep the Meep. Alan Barnes takes on adaptation duties for the second time, and delivers a strong adaptation. More so than the previous story, The Star Beast is a more faithful adaptation of the source material, and the expansions and changes only improve the story. The ending is perhaps the most significant change, bringing in aspects of The Time Witch, but Barnes also expands upon the relationship between Sharon and Fudge, which gives the characters more depth, that is much appreciated. The plot of the story is as strong as the original comic, delivering a rather twisted, yet extremely comedic tale. I particularly enjoyed the twist regarding Beep the Meep and the Wrarth Warriors, and I thought that the reveal was handled remarkably well. The characterizations are largely intact, though Barnes does wonders expanding the Doctor’s character a bit, and also adding depth to Sharon and Fudge. Overall, The Star Beast is a strong adaptation and a strong adventure to boot, featuring a tight cast and a solid script from Alan Barnes.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 3/20/19 4:12 pm
2 out of 3 found this review helpful.

The Iron Legion is a good story, delivering a fairly faithful adaptation of the source material, while bringing the original story to life remarkably well with good performances and strong writing. Tom Baker stars as the Fourth Doctor, alongside guest stars Joseph Kloska as Morris and Toby Longworth as Vesuvius. The cast is largely strong; Baker was perhaps a bit more muted than his recent appearances in the Fourth Doctor Adventures, but I think that was due to the lack of a companion for most of the story. Kloska and Longworth both brought strong comedic chops to the story, which set a lighter tone that clashes well with the darker plot. Alan Barnes is tasked with adapting Pat Mills’ and John Wagner’s original story to audio, and his adaptation is largely faithful, with a few tweaks. The most positive change to the story is Barnes’ tweaking of the Fourth Doctor’s characterization; in the original comics, he comes off as rather flat and unlike the original character at times, so Barnes adds in some lines here and there, and the story comes away with a far more charming lead. I did however think that the expansion of the Stockbridge residents’ role in the story, specifically Doug and Viv, bogged down the story at times though, but in the grand scheme of things, it doesn’t bog the story down too much. The plot is as strong as ever, with Barnes faithfully streamlining and expanding upon the original a bit, to make it work better for audio. The longer runtime affords the story more room to breathe, and only improves it. The writing is excellent, as Barnes updates Mills’ and Wagner’s original script to suit the characters more, and largely improves the characters. Not just the Fourth Doctor, but the “companions du jour” Morris and Vesuvius improve, as do the expanded roles given to Adolphus Caesar and Ironicus. Overall, The Iron Legion is a mostly solid adaptation, and a strong story, featuring some solid performances from the cast, and a mostly well-written adaptation from Alan Barnes.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
1
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
4
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 3/20/19 4:11 pm
2 out of 3 found this review helpful.

The Kamelion Empire is a subpar conclusion to the Kamelion tetralogy, with a strong script somewhat bolstering an entirely lackluster plot. Peter Davison stars as the Fifth Doctor, alongside Jon Culshaw as Kamelion, and guest star Christopher Naylor as Chaos. Davison gives a strong performance here, commanding the scenes with an uncharacteristic gravitas and charisma, compared to his more restrained, almost supporting role in other tales as the Doctor. Culshaw and guest star Naylor are the highlights though, delivering two exceptional performances. Culshaw is a treat as Kamelion throughout, infusing the emotionless robot with a lot of charm and depth, engendering sympathy with his performance, while Naylor delivers a memorable turn as the villain of the story. Jonathan Morris is tasked with concluding the Kamelion tetralogy, and creates a rather lackluster, recycled conclusion to the set. The plot of The Kamelion Empire is remarkably similar to the last three Kamelion stories; Kamelion is taken over by a strong force, and acts as the antagonist of the story before being saved by the Doctor and friends. The window dressing of the tale is different, but this basic plot is so tired and dull at this point, it begs the question of whether or not Kamelion can actually feature in any other type of story, or if his character is so limiting, this is the only basic plot they can go with. The actual meat of the plot is poorly balanced, as Morris shoves an entire story’s worth of exposition regarding Mekalion and the Kamille into an episode and a half, before glossing over this promising plot entirely, in favor or rather padded, boring speeches by the villain. The characters have some depth here, particularly Kamelion, and there’s some early promise in Tegan’s and Turlough’s misgivings about Kamelion, but it’s not enough to cover for the rather abysmal plot. Overall, The Kamelion Empire concludes the Kamelion tetralogy with a lackluster adventure, one that almost makes you happy that it ends with Kamelion neatly excised from the plot.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
4
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 3/13/19 2:39 am
3 out of 4 found this review helpful.

Narcissus is an okay story to close out The Eighth of March with, featuring strong performances, but a more mixed script this time around. Jemma Redgrave stars as Kate Stewart and Ingrid Oliver stars as Osgood, alongside guest star Tracy Wiles as Jacqui McGee. Oliver is a highlight here, getting the chance to shine as two separate, yet similar Osgoods. I was distinctly impressed at how well she was able to distinguish the two different Osgoods in each scene, making it abundantly clear which one was which throughout. Wiles was also an enjoyable guest star, especially in the final act of the story. Sarah Grochala delivers the final script of The Eighth of March, and it’s got some strong parts and weak parts throughout. The plot is a mostly enjoyable affair, with an interesting premise of a, “killer app”. It’s the kind of premise that won’t age well, but in this day and age, it works rather well. The eventual reveal of the alien menaces plays out fairly well as well, but I felt that the ending was a let down. The writing was solid up until the end of the story, as Grochala gave Osgood a chance to shine in a role. However, the main message of Osgood’s character development feels extremely poorly written, and derails an otherwise enjoyable, if not brilliant, adventure. Grochala tries to make a point about Osgood being a satisfied person, but it comes off almost as a parody, that Osgood is so wonderful and special that she doesn’t need a man in her life. It’s a weird bit of writing that just didn’t work out well. Overall though, Narcissus is an decent story, with a strong cast and good writing, save for the ending.

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