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Reviews By SkyTwo
# Reviews:
23
# Ratings:
96
Avg Rating:
7

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: SkyTwoReview Date: 11/28/14 3:29 am
3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

The Companion Chronicles was pretty hit-or-miss, though the same could probably be said of all of Big Finish's product lines. I was sorry to see it end, and eager to see this series begin. I really liked the premise of CC, but there's nothing wrong with 'more Doctor,' either, and Russell gives a characteristically solid performance as Ian and the voice of the Doctor. Carole Ann Ford has had lots of opportunities to do something she wasn't really permitted to do much in her time on the classic series, and it's very refreshing to see Susan as the confident, intelligent young woman that many of the 60s writers just couldn't seem to handle. The supporting cast is also quite good. Maybe even excellent. And things get off to a fantastic start, with the sort of epic adventure that even the newer, costlier TV series can still only dream of.

Which is why I ultimately found myself so disappointed. I was pretty excited to see that the Voord would be returning as the villains for a couple of reasons: first is their enigmatic nature and (flippers aside, of course) the menacing aura it gives them. Second is the fact that I actually kind of LIKED Keys of Marinus. It wasn't what you'd call good, but it was ambitious, imaginative, endearingly cheap, and totally bonkers (near-rape aside, of course). When this story decided to establish a lot of backstory and motive for the Voord, I felt like it was ditching a lot of their appeal. Especially in the way it was handled, which just made them feel like a water-logged imitation of another series villain. The second disappointment was the decision to resolve the threat of a full-scale planetary invasion with a rinky-dink, 60s TV-scale plan.

These are pretty subjective criticisms, of course, and the quality of the performances and the production suggest that a lot of care is going to go into the series. I'll still be looking forward to future entries, and all in all this is a promising start.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: SkyTwoReview Date: 1/10/14 1:04 am
2 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Not realizing Stoyn had been introduced in another audio, I jumped right into Dying Light and enjoyed it quite a bit on its own terms. There are several things about the story that appeal to me: I'm a sucker for ambitious world-building (and this story has a very strong sense of place and identity), I like a little ambiguity in the proceedings rather than a strict black-hat/white-hat scenario, and of course it's great when the author captures what was so appealing about the characters in the first place. I'd say those are all present here, though it's entirely possible that things would be a bit less ambiguous if I'd heard the first Stoyn story. Padbury arguably gets short shrift here, but Zoe's obsession with a series of inscrutable equations is certainly in character, with the action-oriented Jamie making Hines the more appropriate narrator. And at this point in the Companion Chronicles series, the impressions of the First and Second Doctors are bordering on the uncanny, which really adds to the proceedings. But the story isn't perfect. It maybe tries to throw in one Big Idea too many, and the resolution feels oddly abrupt. Its inspirations are a bit obvious as well (though in this case giving a title or two would be too much of a spoiler, so I'll skip it). But these are pretty minor quibbles, and certainly don't outweigh the positives. High marks to the supporting cast, too, not only to the characterization of Stoyn as more sad and bitter than villainous, but to the other inhabitants we meet who have to come to terms with the fact that the man they think they know is actually just the man who might have been.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: SkyTwoReview Date: 1/8/14 2:50 am
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

As hinted at by another reviewer, it's tough to talk about this one-- at all-- without including spoilers. I'll try to tread lightly, but consider this a warning. The fifth series was very much a return to form for the Victorian duo, and aside from the uncharacteristically off-putting Gluttonous Guru, a lot of spooky fun. Events at the end of the Bloodchild Codex, however, suggest a very different story than what we wind up getting here as our heroes finally confront Guinevere Godiva. (Last chance to stop reading!) Going into the second part of Final Act was so jarring that I felt like a marketing team had burst into the writers' room and demanded a rewrite of the final act. The climactic showdown largely jettisons the sinister conspiracies and enigmatic cast members of the 60s London stories in favor of re-enacting a classic Who moment shot for shot. I'd give the first 75% of this two-parter a 9 or 10. Watch that last 25%, though. It's a doozy, and your enjoyment is likely to hinge on whether you perceive it as "affectionate homage" or "lazy retread."
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: SkyTwoReview Date: 12/20/13 3:24 am
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

What a relief this was after the previous... two series? Wow. For a while, the Jago & Litefoot stories were a delight-- light-hearted, atmospheric, and great fun. Then they bafflingly and unnecessarily started doing the Big Finish equivalent of sending the cast to Hawaii and bringing in 'surprise' guest stars. But while these tactics are usually used as a lifeline for a past-its-prime sitcom, in this case they were the source of all the trouble. Fortunately, this episode jettisons all the unwelcome accretions and gets back to what it was doing right from the start. It isn't without its flaws: the new setting works very well, but could be a dangerous gimmick in the wrong hands, and the story does start to waver as it nears the finish. Praise is also due to the duo's new ally Inspector Sacker, nicely played by Wisbey to strike a welcome balance between skeptical straight man and mischievous foil. His character gets more depth and nuance here than poor Louise Jameson's did in eight episodes!

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