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Reviews By Guiannos
# Reviews:
170
# Ratings:
375
Avg Rating:
8

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 4/24/19 11:18 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The first Cybermen story is important. Not only does it introduce one of Doctor Who's most iconic villains but it is the template for the "base under seige" stories that would be the norm for the next few seasons. It is also monumentally influential for including the Doctor's first on screen regeneration (*ahem* "renewal") and pioneering one of the defining aspects of both the character and the series to come. But, for all its importance does it stand the test of time as a story? Absolutely.

The plot is pretty hard sci-fi for its time centering around a rocket exploration of the solar system that reveals a mysterious planet on a collision course with Earth. At first glance the Cybermen could be Robomen (from the Dalek Invasion) in snowsuits with a few extra hoses and mechanical bobs. However, once they start speaking in that eerie singsongy mechanical voice they stand out. This is my favorite version of the creatures despite the cheap look of the costumes- the fabric coverings over the faces that have mechanical components but still an element of flesh and blood emphasize the lost humanity rather than inhumanity that the Cybermen represent. There's a stronger representation of mechanical augmentation to the flesh at play here that is lost with some of their more motorized chrome upgrades to come over the years. The result is creepy and memorable.

Cybermen aside, this is a slow burner of a story that builds a lot of quiet tension and makes good use of the remote and desolate setting. There is nowhere to escape and very limited options to try to resist the invasion. The acting of the main cast is strong with interesting characters in General Cutler and Dr. Barclay but the many supporting characters leave a lot to be desired, especially in the first part. It's a gripe that fades by midway through the story, though, as the Cybermen steal the show and a good portion of the screentime. By the countdown cliffhanger ending part 3 (easily a top 10 all time best for the show) the drama and sense of dread are palpable and the entire cast is on point. The end resolution of the threat is a bit of a fizzle after the build up but it's worthwhile for the ride.

It's a shame that the fourth part is lost. The animated reconstruction does a much better job of conveying the action in some of the quieter scenes than the old Loose Cannon reconstruction but it's still not quite the same as seeing the real thing, especially considering how iconic Hartnell's exit is.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 4/23/19 12:00 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

What starts off as a straightforward, over the top parody of an American crime reality show slowly morphs into a complexly interesting story full of unexpected twists. The thickly spread ham and cheese acting of the TV parody is almost overwhelming self aware and unbearable to the point that when Missy shows up she seems refreshingly grounded. She immediately breaks through the fourth wall and the script opens up (or maybe folds in on itself?) from there as every assumption and expectation the listener may have had up until now is challenged. It's a unique script and brilliant in a completely different way from the previous episode; where Divorced/Beheaded was a fluffy character piece built on dialogue Broken Clock intentionally takes cardboard cutout characters and excels at arranging them in an interesting manner. This story is still cartoony enough to fit in with the previous 2 of the set but manages to also carry itself with a certain dignity that ties it more in with the general tone of Doctor Who. It's difficult to describe but certainly worth listening.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 4/20/19 6:49 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The meeting between Missy and the Monk is probably the selling point of this box set for most fans and John Dorney absolutely nails it. This is easily one of the funniest Big Finish productions I've heard across any range. Missy and the Monk trade quips throughout the hour long story as each tries to outmaneuver the other in various traps and ploys. Rufus Hound rarely disappoints alone and makes a perfect foil for Gomez. It's a fast paced farce that fits well with the modern TV series in tone and style. Well worth the price of admission and an instant favorite.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 4/20/19 4:29 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Missy series 1 opens with Missy more or less on parole on Earth where she takes a job as nanny while she looks for a means to escape. The restrictions of her parole prevent her from murdering or other Masterly acts. Even before we meet her young charges the exceptional musical cues paint a spot on Mary Poppins parody and set the tone for a whimsical take on the character rather than the dastardly and malevolent force one normally expects. It's all style over substance as the light plot does little with the setup and the ending seems particularly out of character for any version of the Master. Missy manages to get some entertaining lines in despite not having an intellectual equal to spar with. Not quite what I expected from the series but it's a good send up and we'll executed for what it is.

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