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Reviews By Guiannos
# Reviews:
235
# Ratings:
455
Avg Rating:
7

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 6/25/19 12:36 am
3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

The Black Hole is a must listen story for fans of the black & white era. The character writing is spot on for the main cast and it's a brilliant story with a plot that takes a few unexpected turns. Victoria is written particularly well, maybe better than some of her televised adventures, although Deborah Watling's voice has trouble finding the girl she once was. The rest of the cast delivers a dynamite performance that more than makes up for her deficiencies, particularly Frazer Hines' double duty as Jamie and The Doctor. The way he taps into Patrick Troughton is uncanny and this release in particular found me forgetting it was an impersonation. Rufus Hound shines in his chronological debut and absolutely makes the character his own from the start.

It's hard to find faults in this story. The style of storytelling is a little more modern than the 5th season would have offered but it absolutely would have fit well in its intended era. The writing gets bonus points as well for creating a new natural gap that explains The Two Doctors chronology and allows for more stories to slot in between.

Strongly recommended.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
4
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
2
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 6/16/19 1:59 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Originally titled Meltdown, Power Play was one of the early story candidates for the ill fated Season 23 which ultimately was replaced with the Trial of a Timelord arc. Most lists for the season that didn't happen indicate this didn't make the cut so it's sort of a double lost script compared to some of the other Six adventures in the range.

The basic premise is that 6 and Peri arrive on what would have been a fairly contemporary Earth (1980's) where environmental activists are trying to find out what a power company is doing to dispose of nuclear waste. Among the protestors is an elderly Victoria Waterfield. Why Victoria is here, I'm not quite sure. The most likely suggestion I can think of would be that she became interested in environmental science after seeing the second ice age in Earth's future in the Ice Warriors but that's not even hinted at. Nothing is. Victoria just happens to be into green activism, or more accurately anti-nuclear activism, with no rationale behind it. Jo might have made sense here but instead we have a very out of character Victoria.

The plot is straightforward but a little nonsensical. Anticorporate protestors raiding buildings and worry about nuclear waste are all very 80's concepts that are easy to imagine being on screen at the time. The evil plot to dump waste in prehistoric Earth doesn't really make a whole lot of sense, though, so between that and the head scratching inclusion of Victoria there are more negatives to this story than positives.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 6/12/19 3:49 am
4 out of 4 found this review helpful.

Fury from the Deep walks the line between unsettling and terrifying. I'm not talking spooky, I mean classic film horror. There's a delicious irony that most of the existing clips are salvaged bits deemed too intense for broadcast in Australia. This may help the lasting impression of the story. It's entirely possible that, were it recovered, we would be subjected to laughable climactic scenes that look like they were filmed in an automatic carwash. But left to the imagination based on the audio and stills? It's chilling and tense.

The plot is simple. It's a classic story of scientists accidentally awakening something and dragging an inhuman menace up where it begins to infect, influence, and infiltrate the base. There's not a lot of depth to the story and the basic plot points are well travelled territory in Who and other sci-fi. Where this story shines is the atmosphere and tension squeezed from the script. The sound design is immaculate with effects like the pulsing coming from the pipes enhancing scenes with a sense of panic and dread. The acting is also incredible across all the parts, human and inhuman alike. The only complaint I have is the helicopter scenes towards the end dragged on and were out of place but even those fit in with the action style of the era so it's hard to fault it too badly.

The icing in the cake is in Victoria's exit. She had one of the roughest rides of any companion, kidnapped and imprisoned by Daleks, orphaned, abducted, and left to travel because she had no where else to go. She kept a chin up and tried her best to ride out the wave of misfortune, even enjoying parts of her journey, but she obviously had trouble adapting and coping with the Doctor's dangerous lifestyle. It's not entirely unexpected that she would hit a breaking point and decide she can't carry on any more. Victoria gets one of the best farewells of any classic Who companion. Her story arc completes, The Doctor has a softness that he reserves for her as he discusses her decision but leaves it entirely up to her. Jamie's reaction is powerful too as he takes her choice as a personal rejection hinting at the possibility of more feelings below the surface than maybe he let on.

This is an all around brilliant story and we'll worth seeking out.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 6/8/19 7:32 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Continuity note: this story is part 2 in a linked pair of stories and the middle of a trilogy. The previous release is required for background to this one. All 3 are consecutive releases in the Companion Chronicles range.

"I was a god, from a race of gods" is how Stoyn reflects on his lost home and people. It says everything about how he feels about himself and how deeply his loss affects him having been abducted from his home, from his life. All that he knew, all that he loved, was taken from him by the Doctor's careless and he has sworn revenge. In the previous story he was separated from Gallifrey for centuries while he, the Doctor, and Susan were suspended in time. Now we meet him again centuries later, possibly millennia, while he has quietly tracked the Doctor in an attempt to recapture the TARDIS to return home and to see the Doctor punished for his meddling across time and space.

The plot of this part is better than the last but still on the thin side. We're introduced to a floating city on a watery world near the end of its life. The planet is alive and supports the meager people who live on it and Stoyn has adopted a leadership role, helping the people along while enacting his plot to capture technology in the ultimate hopes of escape. Stoyn is more interesting here, half mad from centuries alone, frustrated by time sensitivity in places where the timelines are in flux, and obsessed with revenge and escape for so long that he's lost sight of himself and his original purpose. He's a tragic figure as a villain and made more so by the fact that the Doctor never apologizes, never owns his mistake in abducting and crippling the man to begin with. As a continuation, Stoyn has a pretty satisfactory arc across these 2 stories and could have been done without the third chapter.

What makes this story interesting, though, is how it handles the Time Lords and Gallifrey in general. Where The Beginning derived strength more from the knowledge of the listener by connecting dots it assumes the audience knows, Dying Light takes the opposite approach and comes from the perspective of Jamie and Zoe who know nothing yet of the Doctor's planet and people. Chronologically this release would fall sometime nearly before The War Games and Stoyn heavily foreshadows the closing events of that story. The result is pretty unique in that this isn't a great story on its own, it is improved by the previous story that was heavily entrenched in series lore, but it becomes even better if the listener knows *less* not more about what happens next. It makes for an interesting bookend with the previous story as a nostalgic live note to the black & white era, one piece exploring the beginning and the other the ending when Gallifrey was introduced on television.

Stoyn's story is not yet complete but it could have ended here.

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