Stories:
2092
Members:
644
Submitted Reviews:
4957
Reviewers:
252

Recent Fourth Doctor Adventures Releases

Browse All Fourth Doctor Adventures Releases

Companions

Complete Fourth Doctor Adventures Rankings

Recent Ratings

Top Rated Writers

8.2
8.0
Story Count: 5
7.8
Story Count: 6
7.6
Story Count: 1
7.5
Story Count: 3
7.3
Story Count: 1
7.2
Story Count: 5
6.5
Story Count: 12
6.1

Top Rated Stories 1-10

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 5/23/16 6:46 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Doctor and Romana are in Budapest and they join up with a Vampire hunter to investigate a series of strange murders. While, the idea of alien energy vampires isn't all that interesting and this episode doesn't break new ground with what it does, the episode once again captured the spirit of the era beautifully with a lot of humorous moments worked in, along with a solid performance from Mark Bonnar as the villain and a well-done conclusion, thus making for a very entertaining hour. The cover is also very striking and one of the best ever done for this range.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 5/22/16 8:11 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The story deserves credit for bringing back a little remembered villain, but beyond that the plot is somewhat unremarkable except for the twist of how the aliens are completing this Invasion. What drives this story ultimately is the Season 17 atmosphere and feeling and writer Justin Richards captures it pitch perfect with Tom Baker and Lalla Ward delivering performances that fit that season perfectly. There are some very humorous moments, my favorite being the proper and intellectual Romana forced to read a 1970s DJ's script.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
NA
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 4/15/16 2:27 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Continuing on from last month's story, The Paradox Planet, The Legacy of Death drops us back onto a world where the past and present are at war with one another. Only this time, the future is coming back to the past.

One of my biggest criticisms for last month's story was that they had the great concept of a planet at war with itself, and then barely used it past the first episode. This month's episode uses it a lot more, which I appreciated. It was a really concept and I'm glad to see it used a little more here.

Another of my criticisms was leveled at the guest cast, who felt really tacked on, especially so because of Baker's presence and Ward's presence in the story. This month, the guest cast fared a little better, getting a lot more room to shine, as Baker and Ward were more relegated to the edges of the story. Special recognition should go to Simon Rouse as Drang. He did a great job and his character was a actually fairly fleshed out; he wasn't declaring war on the past for no reason, but because of his love for the extinct animals. His final scene was touching and a real highlight of the story.

As I said above, the story did a much better job with the whole "past vs. present" aspect of the story, which greatly improved the story. I really thought that this story was incredibly clever. It reminded me a lot of some of the (forgive me) timey-wimey stories of the New Series. There was a ton of movement from past to future to past again to future again and so on. It was extremely clever and well written, especially so compared to last month's story.

At the same time, I felt that the story still didn't live up to the potential it had. They referenced it numerous times, mostly talking about the dangers of it, but no one from the future ever really faces the consequences of killing someone from the past. It would've made for an insanely complicated story for sure, but it would've also been extremely interesting I feel. And while Rouse does a better job this month, the rest of the cast just really can't compete with Baker and Ward.

So what do I think? I think this story improved a bit on what the first story did, but I still felt that they had a great story that they could've used and didn't. It felt like a missed opportunity here, which is a shame.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: NewWorldreviewsReview Date: 2/29/16 5:29 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

After three seasons of Leela in the Fourth Doctor Adventures, it certainly nice to get a bit of variety. Sure, Leela's been pared with K9, and we had a season with Mary Tamm's Romana, but other than that, we've not had much change in the Fourth Doctor line-up. However, after the great success of the fourth Doctor Novel Adaptions based on Gareth Roberts' Season 17's novels, it's really nice to see Big Finish giving Tom Baker and Lalla Ward some new material to work with. And while I can't say that Wave Of Destruction is the most novel, or even the most enjoyable story, it is one that perfectly fits in with the tone and feel of the Douglas Adams era of the show.

The plot of this story is pretty lightweight stuff: involving an attempted invasion of Earth by a race of aliens. Sure, that's classic Doctor Who plot, but that's the sort of story that works, when told well. And, while there are some moments that don't quite come off, I thought that, overall, I really liked the central premise. It takes the idea of radio being used as an invasion tool as a basis for it's initial story. It doesn't really push these ideas that far, just using them as a basis for a fun adventure story. I did think that, however, Justin Richards could have pushed the boundaries a little with regards to the comedy and the lightness of tone, however. I did think that the story, at times, took itself a little too seriously, and I thought that with a bit more of a brisk touch, I could have been a really enjoyable piece. The lack of comedy in the situation wasn't necessarily a huge major flaw, but I felt that this was something that could have been pushed more in order to increase the story's appeal. I'm certainly waiting for Jonathan Morris' two stories to really push the comedy elements forward.

Of course, if you haven't listened to this release, you might want to stop reading now. Because, of course, I think the main talking point about this release will probably be the Vardans, who turn out to be the antagonists of this adventure, and I have to say that I'm not quite sure about their inclusion. I was surprised that they were in this story, but only because they were as camp as hell. It was a bit weird, to be honest, because Big Finish usually avoid making their villains that camp, and most often full of menace, but here, I think Justin Richards tried to push the campiness a little bit too much with regards to their characters. It was rather odd, considering that under David Richardson's watch, they let this slip through, considering the work that was done on the race in the Companion Chronicles. I loved the work that was done there, in both The First Wave and The Locked Room, but here, I found the Vardans to be really, really overdone on the cheesy level. It was a bit of a shame, as I think had they been toned down a little bit, it would have worked wonders.

All that said, I thought that this story was a ton of fun, and the way Justin Richards treated his leads was testament to that. The Doctor, Romana and K9 were all given great stuff to do, and they were placed squarely in the centre of the story, which was great. Sometimes, it's better to have focus upon your guest characters, but I think in this case, Richards was absolutely right to place focus upon the regulars. Giving each character plenty to do reinforced the roles for each member of this TARDIS team, and I was particularly happy with the way that Richards forced Romana into a number of uncomfortable situations, such as having to go shoe shopping, or present a Pirate Radio show, using slang words like 'cool' and 'groovy'. It's not really anything new, putting Romana into uncomfortable situations, but I thought it was handled well enough here for them to get away with it. Tom Baker and Lalla Ward have a wonderful chemistry together, almost as good as him and Louise's, and I really liked the way they bounced off each other, the dialogue really aiding that. Together with John Leeson, they create a fantastic group dynamic, and I'm really looking forward to seeing how that plays out in future audios.

The guest characters were diverting, not really that interesting, but nevertheless, mildly interesting. My personal favourites were Mark and Miller, simply because they felt very Douglas Adams-y in their approach. They were characters who could have fitted into a story written by Adams, no problem. I did think they were lacking a little in depth, but they were still interesting, and I thought that Karl Theobald and Phil Mulyrne were excellent in their parts, and the standout members of the cast. The rest of the cast were also good, not quite as excellent as Mulyrne and Theobald, but they were good. I thought John Banks chewed the scenery brilliantly, despite the fact that his part was camp as anything. He actually sounded like Lady Adastra from Creature From The Pit for some reason, why I can't think. Jane Slavin and Alix Wilton Regan did the best they could, but I did think their parts, like the Vardans themselves, were rather insubstantial. Nick Briggs' direction was good, but I would say that it wasn't one of his stronger plays. He kept the cast on the right lines, but I don't think injected any spark or energy into the script, something I think was sorely needed. Alistair Lock's sound design and music was excellent, however, really capturing that tone of the era, without feeling the need to have that permeate the whole soundtrack. I thought it was incredibly polished, and would stand as some of his best work for Big Finish.

While I wouldn't say that Wave Of Destruction was a complete right-off, on the contrary it was a very polished piece, it perhaps suffered from a few major faults that prevented it from being the great story it could have been. I did really like the ideas behind it, and the brevity and lightness of touch, from both writer and lead actors, meant that this story simply flew by. However, I don't think it's going to be one I'm going to remember in years to come.

Community

For other Big Finish and Doctor Who related content be sure to check out some excellent community websites: